Zee - Identity (CD)

Genre:

Crossover-Prog

Style:

CD

Label:

EMI

Format:

CD


Regular price €14,90

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Studio Album, released in 1984

Songs / Tracks Listing

1. Confusion (4:17)
2. Voices (6:20)
3. Private Person (3:36)
4. Strange Rhythm (6:36)
5. Cuts Like A Diamond (5:36)
6. By Touching (5:39)
7. How Do You Do It? (4:45)
8. Seems We Were Dreaming (4:57)
Bonus: Eyes Of A Gipsy (on cassette version only)

Total Time: 41:50

Line-up / Musicians

- Richard Wright / keyboards, backing vocals, percussion, Fairlight
- Dave Harris / guitars, vocals, keyboards, percussion, Fairlight

Richard Wright biography
RICHARD WILLIAM WRIGHT was born on 28th July, 1943, in Hatch End, London. His parents, Bridie and Cedric Wright had two other children, Selina and Guinevere. Rick attended the Haberdasher's School, and when he was 17 years old, the Regent Street Polytechnic, where he met ROGER WATERS and NICK MASON. They started a group and six months later were joined by lead guitarist SYD BARRETT. After BARRETT was replaced by DAVID GILMOUR, the band gradually redefined their style over half a dozen albums. In Ummagumma the band was allowed to combine a straightforward live album with a second disc, comprising four sections, each recorded by one band member as a solo activity. WRIGHT's instrumental contribution, Sysyphus (parts 1-4) was named after a character in Greek mythology.

You'll find that not only did he tickle the ivories (or plastics), but he also managed to find time to write and sing a number of the FLOYD's ditties, like The Great Gig in the Sky (The Dark Side of the Moon).The band's phenomenal success during the time when Wish You Were Here and Animals were released led to a great amount of tension and conflicts among the band members. Solo albums were a safety valve and WRIGHT released Wet Dream in 1978. WRIGHT was accompanied by top session musicians Mel Collins (sax), Snowy White (guitar), Larry Steele (bass) and Reg Isadore (drums). No singles were released from the album, and WRIGHT did not perform any concerts. By the time they came to record The Wall in 1979 ROGER WATERS was assuming control of the band. WRIGHT felt the full brunt of this when WATERS threatened not to release The Wall unless WRIGHT left the band. WRIGHT spent the next two years as a paid employee, playing The Wall in America, Britain and Germany.

Being paid on a wage, he was the only member of PINK FLOYD to actually make money on that tour (yes, the FLOYD lost their shirts on that tour--it was so phenomenally expensive to put on, and they did so few shows that they couldn't recoup their investment. The rest of the band were investors, as it were, but WRIGHT's role was the same as that of the roadies--fixed dollar amount per night or some such. So he didn't get reamed like everyone else). He did not appear on The Final Cut.

After leaving PINK FLOYD, WRIGHT formed a short-lived partnership, called ZEE who released Identity ('84), with Dave Harris, former leader of New Romantic band FASHION, with WRIGHT composing music for Harris' lyrics...
RICHARD WILLIAM WRIGHT was born on 28th July, 1943, in Hatch End, London. His parents, Bridie and Cedric Wright had two other children, Selina and Guinevere. Rick attended the Haberdasher's School, and when he was 17 years old, the Regent Street Polytechnic, where he met ROGER WATERS and NICK MASON. They started a group and six months later were joined by lead guitarist SYD BARRETT. After BARRETT was replaced by DAVID GILMOUR, the band gradually redefined their style over half a dozen albums. In Ummagumma the band was allowed to combine a straightforward live album with a second disc, comprising four sections, each recorded by one band member as a solo activity. WRIGHT's instrumental contribution, Sysyphus (parts 1-4) was named after a character in Greek mythology.

You'll find that not only did he tickle the ivories (or plastics), but he also managed to find time to write and sing a number of the FLOYD's ditties, like The Great Gig in the Sky (The Dark Side of the Moon).The band's phenomenal success during the time when Wish You Were Here and Animals were released led to a great amount of tension and conflicts among the band members. Solo albums were a safety valve and WRIGHT released Wet Dream in 1978. WRIGHT was accompanied by top session musicians Mel Collins (sax), Snowy White (guitar), Larry Steele (bass) and Reg Isadore (drums). No singles were released from the album, and WRIGHT did not perform any concerts. By the time they came to record The Wall in 1979 ROGER WATERS was assuming control of the band. WRIGHT felt the full brunt of this when WATERS threatened not to release The Wall unless WRIGHT left the band. WRIGHT spent the next two years as a paid employee, playing The Wall in America, Britain and Germany.

Being paid on a wage, he was the only member of PINK FLOYD to actually make money on that tour (yes, the FLOYD lost their shirts on that tour--it was so phenomenally expensive to put on, and they did so few shows that they couldn't recoup their investment. The rest of the band were investors, as it were, but WRIGHT's role was the same as that of the roadies--fixed dollar amount per night or some such. So he didn't get reamed like everyone else). He did not appear on The Final Cut.

After leaving PINK FLOYD, WRIGHT formed a short-lived partnership, called ZEE who released Identity ('84), with Dave Harris, former leader of New Romantic band FASHION, with WRIGHT composing music for Harris' lyrics. There were again no live dates. This is the only FLOYD solo album never released on CD anywhere. He did, however, appear as a session musician on A Momentary Lapse of Reason, and also participated in the Delicate Sound of Thunder tour. With The Division Bell he finally was fully back in the band co-writing Wearing The Inside Out with lyricist Anthony Moore and co-writing the music for Cluster One, What Do You Want From Me, Marooned, and Keep Talking with DAVID GILMOUR. Millions of fans felt exactly the same way during PINK FLOYD's Division Bell world tour which played over 100 shows, culminating in their 14-night stint at London's Earls Court in the autumn of 1994.

WRIGHT's second solo album, Broken China, released in 1996, included contributions by the likes of Manu Katché, Pino Palladino and Sinéad O'Connor. After that, he appeared on stage in London with the rest of PINK FLOYD on the occasion of the Live 8 concert, on July 2, 2005. He also contributed keyboards to GILMOUR's solo album On an Island, and toured with him as part of his backing band in 2006.

Sadly and unexpectedly, RICHARD WRIGHT passed away on September 15, 2008, after a short battle with cancer. At the time of his death, he had been working on a new solo album.